fbpx

Great Lakes Now Presents

Learn about what PFAS contamination in drinking water has meant to families in west Michigan in this Emmy-winning documentary from Great Lakes Now.

Watch the Program

Emmy Winner: “The Forever Chemicals” takes documentary prize

The Great Lakes Now team that produced “The Forever Chemicals” won the 2020 Michigan Emmy in the Health/Science – Program/Special category.

Read More

The PFAS Problem

John Oliver’s “Last Week Tonight” program on HBO features Great Lakes Now work.

See More

PFAS Pollution

Has the U.S. Air Force done enough to clean up firefighting foam?

Watch

Previous

Next

The Forever Chemicals Show

It’s a curious acronym — PFAS — and it stands for a family of chemicals that’s in most homes and being detected in an increasing number of people’s water systems in Michigan and other states and provinces. “Forever Chemicals” is what PFAS, PFOA and PFOS are all known as because of how long it takes them to break down in people’s bodies and the environment. These groups of industrial chemicals are used in many non-stick household products, food packages and waterproofed outdoor clothing. And research is only beginning to determine the health effects and what, if any, treatment there might be.

What can people do to protect themselves and their families? How are federal, state and local governments responding? What responsibility does industry have? And what are the financial, medical and social costs?

Great Lakes Now’s coverage has explored these issues and more. Find our work and our partners’ reporting on this page.

 

Watch NOW

COLLABORATIONS

Since 2019, Great Lakes Now has partnered with MLive Media Group to bring audiences news and information about PFAS and drinking water. The collaboration began with the “Forever Chemicals documentary and these MLive articles about the financial cost to local communities who need to deal with the contaminations. The project was supported by the Ravitch Fiscal Reporting Program at the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at the City University of New York.

Oscoda residents say ‘enough’ after 9 years of PFAS with no cleanup plan

Oscoda residents say ‘enough’ after 9 years of PFAS with no cleanup plan

Representatives from a number of Michigan communities—Oscoda, Flint, Detroit and Belmont among them—gathered on Wednesday to call on the U.S. Air Force for action on PFAS cleanup.

- by MLive
The Forever Chemicals: MLive Reporters and Great Lakes Now engage Sustainable Brands 2019 audience

The Forever Chemicals: MLive Reporters and Great Lakes Now engage Sustainable Brands 2019 audience

After a documentary screening at the Sustainable Brands 2019 conference in Detroit, Great Lakes Now hosted an audience discussion with the MLive Media Group reporters who have been leading the coverage of the PFAS issue in Michigan.

- by Sandra Svoboda
PFAS pollution already costing Michigan communities millions

PFAS pollution already costing Michigan communities millions

Michigan residents may be in line to pay for the fixes to PFAS contamination for years to come.

- by Paula Gardner
Ann Arbor spends $1 million to deal with PFAS contamination

Ann Arbor spends $1 million to deal with PFAS contamination

The city started to ask in 2017: “What can we do about it?”

- by Paula Gardner
In West Michigan, sticker shock over toxic water costs

In West Michigan, sticker shock over toxic water costs

Plainfield Township officials estimate that $62 million is needed to bring municipal water to areas contaminated by PFAS chemicals.

- by Garret Ellison

PFAS Stories from Great Lakes Now

Prev 1 of 5 Next
Prev 1 of 5 Next

Digital Credits

“The Forever Chemicals” documentary was produced by Rob Green and Sandra Svoboda.

Digital Designers: Shelby Jouppi, Mila Murray

Digital Video for “The Forever Chemicals” documentary: Angela Brayman, Marie Gould, Rob Green, Zosette Guir, Matt Ilas, William Kubota, Sandra Svoboda, Jordan Wingrove, Ernie Zinger

With additional production support and partnership from MLive Media Group and the Ravitch Fiscal Reporting program at the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at the City University of New York.

 

[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]