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More from “Poisonous Ponds: Tackling Toxic Coal Ash”

More from “Poisonous Ponds: Tackling Toxic Coal Ash”
October 11, 2022 GLN Editor

In August, the “Poisonous Ponds: Tackling Toxic Coal Ash” student reporting initiative investigated the complicated policy and impacts of coal ash in the Great Lakes. The special collaboration included Great Lakes Now, The Energy News Network, and Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications.

Keep up with more coal ash news published by The Energy News Network as part of this project:

How Puerto Rico’s banned coal ash winds up in rural Georgia

After Puerto Rico banned coal ash storage, the toxic waste from its coal plant is being quietly shipped through Florida to Georgia. Residents and leaders are upset, but feel powerless.

As utilities seek to relocate coal ash, will Black communities bear the burden?

The EPA’s crackdown on coal ash means more coal plants may excavate coal ash to out-of-state landfills. This could be good for the environment, while making communities like Uniontown, Alabama, feel like dumping grounds.

In Georgia, ratepayers face a big bill for coal ash cleanup, while a utility profits

Georgians are staring down decades of environmental damage and billions in extra utility fees — or maybe both.

‘High and dry’: How toxic coal ash could be the next opportunity — or the next broken promise — for the Northern Cheyenne tribe

The potential closure of Montana’s Colstrip power plant would leave one in five Northern Cheyenne tribal members without jobs — and five decades’ worth of coal ash to clean up. The potential closure of Montana’s Colstrip power plant would leave one in five Northern Cheyenne tribal members without jobs — and five decades’ worth of coal ash to clean up.

Long burdened by a coal plant, South Memphis residents say no to coal ash in their backyard

South Memphis residents have long suffered from pollution from TVA’s Allen Fossil Plant. Now TVA is trucking the coal ash through their community to a nearby landfill, and documents show the federal agency finalized this plan while leaving residents in the dark.


Catch more from The Energy News Network at Great Lakes Now: 

Greening a home — and the next generation — in Wisconsin

Solar, storage projects set to bring jobs, tax revenue to Illinois coal communities


Featured image: Even as coal plants around the country have closed in high numbers, coal ash is left behind and there’s nearly a billion tons of the toxic material. By nature, these coal plants are usually near water, and the leftover coal ash can leach into groundwater affecting drinking water for nearby residents. (Photo Credit: GLN)

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