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Recreation, Tourism and Culture

  • Authors
    Photo by Blount Small Ship Adventures via Allison Faria

    Summer Cruising

    - by Ian Wendrow

    The cruise ship industry has been steadily growing in the Great Lakes region over the past decade and a half. From just a couple of ships making sporadic trips in 2002, there are now five separate cruise lines operating seven ships, with even more fleet expansions expected in 2020.

  • Authors
    Photo by James Proffitt

    Anglers on Ice

    - by James Proffitt

    Call it hard water fishing or ice fishing. Either way it’s cold, although it could be warm. All depends on how you do it. But for certain, every year hundreds of thousands of Great Lakes residents and visitors spend time hanging out on top of the ice, working to finagle fish from beneath it.

  • About Great Lakes Now
    Image by Up North Memories via flickr.com cc 2.0

    Cruising the Past: Historical film takes viewers on a Great Lakes cruise ship

    - by Ian Wendrow

    Great Lakes cruise-ship season is still a few months away, but a film is taking viewers on a 52-minute voyage to ports of call and many famous sites on the freshwater lakes.

  • Asian Carp

    PBS NewsHour Report: University of Illinois serves invasive Asian carp for dinner

    - by GLNeditor

    Students can also choose smoked Silverfin with green tea on rice or fried Silverfin topped with mixed greens. It turns out “Silverfin” is another name for Asian carp, an invasive species wreaking havoc in lakes and rivers across the Midwest. And this Silverfin smorgasbord is a part of Illinois’ novel efforts to battle back the fish, which are now within 50 miles from entering Lake Michigan.

  • Authors
    Photo by James Proffitt

    (Almost) Everything You Want to Know about Lake Erie’s Walleye Population

    - by James Proffitt

    The walleye population in Lake Erie has exploded during the past few years — the fishing is considered to be great, and fisheries managers say it will likely get better in the near future as younger fish grow to keeping size.

  • Advocacy
    Photo by Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge via John Hartig

    John Dingell – A Conservation Hero As Remembered by John Hartig

    - by John Hartig

    Throughout his life Dingell was a congressional page, a park ranger, a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army during World War II, an assistant county prosecutor, and always a lover of the great outdoors.
    He grew up fishing and hunting in and along the Detroit River and western Lake Erie.

  • Authors
    Photo by Jerry Jourdan via John Hartig

    A Great Lakes Moment from John Hartig

    - by John Hartig

    Raptors are birds of prey that hunt food primarily by flight, using their keen senses, chiefly vision.  Examples of raptors include broad-winged hawks, bald eagles, peregrine falcons, osprey, and others.

  • Authors
    Kiosk streaming live feeds from cameras 247 on Public Square, Cleveland. Provided by Julia Christensen

    Great Lakes artists work with water, weather, love

    - by James Proffitt

    The intersection of art and nature — especially now — is becoming more popular in the digital age where social media holds sway over the time and attentions of so many. And for artists working to gather audiences, and grasp the natural world through paints and lenses, the Internet can be a crucial link.

  • Authors
    Photo by Waterfront Toronto via John Hartig

    A Great Lakes Moment from John Hartig

    - by John Hartig

    A recent case study of the cleanup of Toronto Harbour has shown that investing in environmental cleanup and restoration yields considerable economic and social benefits. If cities want to achieve competitive advantage, environmental cleanup and protection are essential.

  • Authors
    Photo by photo by U.S. Navy Mass Communication 3rd Class Specialist Kenneth R. Hendrix

    A Great Lakes Moment from John Hartig

    - by John Hartig

    The Buffalo River was viewed as a working river that supported industry and commerce, and water pollution then was viewed as just part of the cost of doing business. At that time, people cared most about jobs and providing for their families, with little concern for the environment and its pollution.
    There is, perhaps, no more poignant example of this societal indifference to water pollution than when the Buffalo River caught on fire 50 years ago